Synonym Great

111 Words to Use Instead of Great (Infographic)

111 Words to Use Instead of Great (Infographic)

 

Frequently Asked Questions

What word can I use instead of great?

People often use “good” as a lazy replacement for a more appropriate word. Custom Writing has created an excellent infographic that lists 200 words you can use instead of “good”. For instance, to describe the taste, use “scrumptious” or “delicious”. To describe a performance, use “stellar” or “captivating”

What’s a fancy word for good?

Great, satisfying, exceptional, positive, acceptable, satisfactory, valuable, superb, marvelous, bad, wonderful, favorable, excellent, respectable, honest, useful, talented, efficient, reliable, able.

What’s a big word for great?

Excessive, exorbitant, extravagant, extreme, immoderate, inordinate. Abundant, ample, appreciable, copious, plentiful. fat, thick. Capacious, commodious, roomy, spacious

Thesis Statement Examples

Thesis Statement Examples

How to Write a Thesis Statement with Examples

A thesis statement is a crucial part of any academic paper.

Not only do you need a strong and valid thesis statement, but you also need to create persuasive arguments to support it.

If you are to develop a good thesis statement, you need to understand the definition of a thesis statement, why you need to include a thesis statement in your academic paper, and what makes a good thesis statement.

We have addressed all those things in this article.

Plus, there are thesis statement examples to demonstrate how to create a good thesis statement.

Additionally, we have included a section on how to avoid common thesis statement mistakes.

Use our free Thesis Statement Generator Tool Here

What Is A Thesis Statement?

A thesis statement is a claim you present for your essay.

You write it towards the end of the introduction, i.e., after introducing the reader to the topic and its significance.

The thesis statement informs the reader of your stand on the topic of discussion.

All the arguments you make in your paper should support your thesis statement.

The task of coming up with a thesis statement seems so tricky.

But, what you are failing to realize is that you do not have to write it first, and you can always change it to match the theme of your paper.

It is easier to match your thesis to your paper than to match your paper with your thesis.

How To Phrase A Thesis Statement – With Thesis Statement Examples

A good thesis statement clearly and transparently answers a specific question.

In this section, we are going to show you three examples of thesis statements with explanations of why they were developed that way.

Thesis statement example 1: Cycling in the morning and evening promotes heart health in adults.

This thesis statement addresses the question of whether cycling is healthy.

The statement makes it very clear that cycling is healthy.

Another way to phrase such a thesis would be ‘cycling is healthy’.

But that is a very general statement.

What makes this example of a thesis statement strong is because it is precise and states why cycling is healthy (it improves heart health), and for whom cycling is healthy (adults).

The takeaway here is that a good thesis statement does not state the obvious.

Your thesis statement should provide your reader with extra information.

Telling your reader what they already know does make them interested in continuing to read your paper.

Note that, the point of an academic paper is not to address something readers already know and agree with.

A good academic paper should present your point of view and bring up an argument that is both challengeable and debatable.

Use our free Thesis Statement Generator Tool Here

Thesis statement example 2: The initial cost of school uniforms seems why, but uniforms promote equality by removing the visual income difference between students.

This thesis statement answers the question ‘should school uniforms be introduced in our institutions?’

It is a strong thesis because, first, it cites one reason why some people are against uniforms, then provides very valid importance of uniforms.

A reader will be interested in reading the arguments supporting the notion that uniforms promote equality.

Thesis statement example 3: The internet has improved the quality of life.

This thesis statement is for an essay about the advantages of the internet.

However, it is an extremely weak thesis.

Most readers already know the internet has improved lives.

So, why should they read your paper?

Readers would have been interested in reading the arguments in such a paper if the thesis statement was specific on how the internet has improved lives, and whose lives it has developed.

What Makes Good Thesis Statement?

There is no specific answer to that question because what will be a good thesis for an argumentative essay will not be so strong for an informative essay, a persuasive essay, and other types of papers.

A thesis statement for an informative essay should provide a general overview of the topic, and a brief summary of the main points in the essay.

For example:

Research indicates that sleep improves productivity by refreshing the body’s energy levels, reducing the buildup of stress hormones, consolidating memory.

For most essays and academic papers, follow the rule of three when developing your thesis statement.

The rule of three dictates that your thesis should provide three important pieces of information, especially if you are writing an informative or expository essay.

Following the rule of three, means that the thesis statement for argumentative and persuasive essays should provide three good reasons why you have a valid claim.

The rule of three is especially helpful when developing a thesis statement for middle school and high school essays.

These essays take the five-paragraph structure.

Providing three points in your thesis allows you to focus on each point in its own paragraph in the body of your essay.

However, university-level papers are lengthier and often have a more complex structure.

Therefore, you should develop a thesis statement that matches the length, purpose, and structure of the paper.

The following is a thesis statement example of a university-level research paper:

Society, media, and religion still uphold traditional family values. These family values insist on the father-mother-child nuclear family structure. This conventional family structure is outdated and has negative psychological effects on children from single-parent families.

That is a good thesis statement because it informs the reader what the paper is all about and clearly presents the writer’s point of view.

The statement is also good because it provides the writer with a road map for acquiring relevant data when conducting research.

Common Thesis Statement Mistakes

  • Choosing to write about a topic you are not interested in or familiar with.
  • Choosing a point of view or argument you cannot validate with strong evidence from your sources.
  • Using words that express uncertainty such as, may, might, could, should.
  • Going with an obvious claim that is not challengeable – there is no point researching and arguing an indisputable claim.

Conclusion

A thesis statement should be precise, provide an answer to a specific question, communicate your stance clearly, and allow debate.

If you experience problems building your own thesis statement, refer to the provided thesis statement examples and tips shared in this article.

Alternatively, contact us for a professional thesis statement help.

Use our free Thesis Statement Generator Tool Here

Racism Thesis Statement

How to Write Racism Thesis Statement with Examples

How to Write Racism Thesis Statement with Examples

As a student, you will handle a wide range of subjects and assignments.

One topic that is popular for essays and research papers is racism.

There are a lot of resources on the topic, so students tend to assume a racism essay is easy.

The challenge you will face with a racism essay is not content, but coming up with a thesis statement.

A racism thesis statement should be powerful and something your audience can understand and relate to.

Use our free Thesis Statement Generator Tool Here

In this article, you will find useful guidelines and tips on how to write a racism thesis statement and examples of racism thesis statements.

Tips On How To Write A Racism Thesis Statement

Before writing your racism thesis statement, consider the following guidelines.

  1. Find a racism topic or issue to write about

Racism is a broad issue that continues to plague the world even today.

For that reason, it shouldn’t be difficult to find an informative topic from which you can develop a thesis statement.

You can choose to approach racism through other social issues such as art, politics, economy, equitability, poverty, and history.

2. Pick a topic that is interesting to you

You might not be familiar with all the issues surrounding racism.

And, as mentioned earlier, racism is a broad topic; there are many approaches you can take in your paper.

Therefore, to have an easier time developing a thesis, pick a racism topic that interests you.

For instance, if you are conversant with the history of America, your thesis statement could focus on the effects of racism during the Civil Rights Movement that began in 1954 and ended in 1968.

3. Hook your reader

As you write your thesis statement, try to include a hook.

A hook is a statement that grabs the attention of a reader.

Try hooking your reader by relating your thesis to popular culture.

You could even refer to current issues on the news or even relate to popular television programs, movies, or books.

4. Avoid offensive language

Remember racism is a personal issue; it is open to bias depending on your line of thinking.

Therefore, most of the issues surrounding this topic are controversial.

When discussing a controversial topic in an academic paper, avoid offensive and rude language.

Examples Of Racism Thesis Statements

To get a good score in your racism-related research paper or essay, you need a well-thought-out and well-constructed thesis statement.

The following are examples of thesis statements in different racism topics.

Existence of racism

Such an essay tries to prove that racial segregation is still a significant social problem.

Therefore, your thesis statement should focus on the problems racial segregation causes.

Consider the following example:

It is a fact that police killings involving people of color are more compared to white people. Joshua Correll of the University of Colorado, confirmed this when he designed a game where the participants played cops. The results of the game indicated that, despite the race of the people playing cop, they were more willing to kill a person of color and showed hesitation when the suspect was a white person. This shows that racism continues to plague society.

Use our free Thesis Statement Generator Tool Here

Workplace-related racism

Racism is a form of prejudice often experienced in a workplace environment.

A workplace racism thesis statement could read as follows:

Prejudice in a workplace environment is a backward practice that undermines productivity. In the professional sphere, whites are considered to be mentally superior and therefore they get the top jobs which pay higher wages. Blacks are considered to be physically endowed, and therefore they land physical labor jobs, which generally pay lower.

Anti-racism movements

Anti-racism is a phrase that was coined by people who formed movements to fight the consequences of racism.

The greatest anti-racist movement was the one led by Martin Luther King Jr between the early 50s and the late 60s.

Another key antiracist figure was Nelson Madiba Mandela of South Africa.

Anti-racism also covers the beliefs and policies set to combat racial discrimination.

An anti-racism essay thesis statement should evoke emotion from a reader.

The following is an example:

Anti-racism movement leaders were treated inhumanely; Nelson Mandela was imprisoned for 27 years and Martin Luther King Junior was assassinated. But, without them, society today would not be as egalitarian as it is. Their sacrifices are the sole reason blacks and whites can walk on the same street and even work together to create a brighter future.

Cause and effect

You can choose to write about the cause and effect of racism.

For example, ignorance is a cause of racism that results in fear and eventually violence.

The following is an example of a thesis statement that focuses on ignorance and fear as the primary causes of racism.

Undoubtedly racism has negative consequences, key among them being fear and violence, as a result of a need to protect themselves. One major cause of racism is ignorance. Uneducated and unexposed feel threatened by people of a different race. Such people condone and practice this prejudice without considering it has negative effects and consequences on both the individuals they are discriminating and the society at large.

Racism Thesis statements based on art and literature

Books, music, and movies cover a wide variety of racism topics.

The following are examples of literary and artworks you can base a racism essay on:

  1. Othello

Othello is a play by Shakespeare that addresses some delicate societal issues such as racism.

You could develop a thesis statement highlighting the racism in the play.

Othello, who was black, was highly disrespected by Lago, and other characters such as Emilia, Roderigo, and Brabantio. These characters labeled him ‘Barbary horse’, ‘an old black ram’, ‘thick lips’ and other demeaning names. He was also abused for marrying a Venetian woman. All this shows that there is a strong conviction that one race is superior to the other and a barbaric intolerance towards the ‘inferior’ race.

2. To kill a mocking bird

This book by Harper Lee is popular for the way it portrayed the struggles of a black man in the southern states in the early 20th century.

The book is a good source for a racism essay as it depicts racism and effects in an easily comprehensible way.

The following is an example of a racism thesis statement from To Kill a Mocking Bird:

Tom Robinson was suspected of murdering Mayella Ewell, a white woman, and was sentenced not because there was any evidence but because he was black. White characters, like Atticus Finch, Scout, and Jem, who tried to defend him were given shaming names such as ‘Nigger lovers’. The story in the book clearly shows the tribulations a black man went through and how his word meant nothing.

3. Disney films

Disney films are popular for their interesting and fascinating stories, as well as world-class acting and production.

However, close scrutiny of several films and you will realize there is a certain degree of racial prejudice in the way the films portray characters.

The following is an example of a thesis statement focusing on the racial prejudice in Disney films:

There is a significant degree of racial prejudice in the way Disney portray characters in their films. For example, in Jungle Book, the gorillas communicated in an African vernacular language. Another example is in Lady and the Tramp where the cat villains had slanted eyes and spoke with an East Asian accent. The film production company has a tendency to portray protagonists as white and antagonists as people of color.

4. Advertisements

The advertisement sector also depicts racial discrimination.

To demonstrate, consider this thesis statement:

Several surveys show that black people are underrepresented in commercials, both mainstream media, and online ads. According to the US Census Bureau 2010 records, blacks, and other racial minorities represent 30% of the population. Yet, only 7% of ads involve black people while the other racial minorities are hardly ever represented.

Conclusion

Racism is a fairly easy subject for an essay and research paper.

However, it has so many sources and so many different points of view that selecting one idea to focus on creating a thesis statement can be problematic.

But, with the guidelines shared above developing a thesis statement for your racism essay will not be as difficult.

Remember, you need to let the reader know your point of view and you should demonstrate your objectiveness on the issue.

Use our free Thesis Statement Generator Tool Here

Example of thesis statements on racism

  1. Racism across the world can end if the rate of global collaboration, interracial and intercultural communication continues to increase.
  2. Racial minorities in America still face covert discrimination despite the institutional and societal changes witnessed in America in the sixties.
  3. Multiculturalism has failed as an institutional practice in Europe, and this can be determined by the increase in hate crimes cases as well as racial minority issues.
  4. Despite the significance given to the affirmative action in countering racial discrimination, there are concerns that it promotes racial differences.
  5. There exists misconception that the affirmative action is a women’s agenda.
  6. Racial discrimination founded on a single person’s actions but taken to be the general state of affairs for the given race is wrong.
  7. Racism in the workplace has adverse impacts on the productivity of workers as it affects their aggressiveness.
  8. It costs nothing to point out racism actions in the workplace.
  9. The majority of politicians in the world rely on racism as a means of garnering votes as well as grabbing power.
  10. The rate of racial hatred and related crimes is high in Australian universities.
  11. Students diversity can play a significant role in reducing racial crimes and related issues.
  12. Embracing diversity in the workplace can help reduce incidences of racial discrimination.
  13. Transgender, bisexual, gay and lesbian Americans have experienced discrimination by the society.
  14. In the thirties, the Blacks have lived in hatred and poverty
  15. In the past, it was considered a strange thing to show affection to Black Americans.
  16. Despite the frowning upon among the majority of citizens in America, racial discrimination is a common practice especially in the home of the brave.
  17. The issue of racial equality is a social barrier that the Americans are yet to overcome.
  18. There are wide geographical and psychological distances between Asians and the Blacks in America, and such distances can be attributed to the segregation by the American society government or the white-centric media.

Rephrase A Thesis Statement

Rephrase A Thesis Statement Excellent Writing guide (2020)

How to Rephrase A Thesis Statement

The papers requested in tertiary education are meant to convince or persuade a reader to agree with your point of view.

A good paper, therefore, will effectively convince a reader that you not only have an excellent idea but also a logical point of view on a given subject or topic.

For that reason, after introducing the topic of discussion, you write your thesis statement, which is mostly a sentence or two.

Your thesis statement declares your position on the topic of discussion; it tells your reader your focus idea and guides them towards the direction you will take.

In other words, a thesis statement is a summary of the argument in the body of your paper.

The thesis statement of your paper appears in two places – the introduction and the conclusion.

Use our free Thesis Statement Generator Tool Here

You write your thesis statement in the conclusion to remind the readers of the point you have been trying to make throughout the paper.

However, in conclusion, you will have to rephrase your thesis: you can’t simply repeat it as you phrased it in the introduction.

The wording and the sentence structure of your thesis statement in the last paragraph have to be different.

The following is a guide on how to go about restating a thesis statement.

Figure out a suitable position for your restatement

Most of the time, the restatement comes at the beginning of the conclusion.

However, it does not necessarily have to be the first sentence.

For example, you could begin your conclusion with a rhetorical question, then a restatement of your thesis.

But, there is no clear-cut formula for writing a conclusion.

It helps to write a rough draft of your conclusion so you can figure out the ideal position for your thesis restatement.

In fact, you might have to test several positions of the restatement so you can figure out the most ideal.

Make it have a deeper impact

By the time a reader gets to the conclusion, they have gone through the rest of the essay.

Therefore, they have a better idea of what the essay is all about and your stand on the topic of discussion.

Take advantage of all this by restating your thesis statement in a way that it will have a deeper level of emotional impact.

One way of restating a thesis with a deeper meaning is addressing the reader.

Let’s say your essay discusses cybersecurity for small businesses, you could start your thesis restatement by saying, “As a small business owner, …”

Such a statement creates a connection with the reader and will help relate the points in the body of the essay to your thesis.

Answer the “so what” question

The thesis statement in the introduction might not answer the ‘so what’ question.

The one in the conclusion should because the reader has already gone through the main points of your argument.

Answering the ‘so what’ question tells your reader the significance of your argument.

And, telling your readers the significance of your argument adds weight to your thesis.

Let’s say your paper is about the impact of drug abuse in college.

Use our free Restate Thesis Statement Generator Tool Here

You could address the ‘so what’ question by restating your thesis statement as follows:

Drug abuse in colleges is slowly becoming an epidemic at the watch of college authorities and parents who can help contain this problem by widening their perspective to accommodate more effective solutions such as helping the youth find better ways to deal with stress and frustration.

Avoid clichés when you rephrase a thesis statement

When rephrasing your thesis statement, do not start with clichés such as ‘In conclusion’.

Such starts are boring and do not add meaning to your thesis.

Also, such phrases and your lecturer will simply conclude you lack creativity.

To avoid these phrases, start your conclusion using a fresh take of what the paper discusses or a rhetorical question related to your argument.

Do not make apologies

When writing your conclusion, you should be confident that you have given enough proof in the body of your paper.

So, as you restate your thesis and as you write other sentences in your conclusion do not make apologetic statements.

Such statements include:

  • It is possible that…
  • It seems like…
  • It is just my opinion…

These phrases undermine your argument and make it seem like you are not confident in the evidence you have provided.

However, if the topic of discussion was just a possibility, you can use such language.

Also, do not use absolute language if your essay includes two opposing viewpoints; you might alienate some of your readers.

How to make the restatement different from the original thesis

The following are tips on how to make the thesis restatement sound different:

Vary the structure of the statement

One of the best ways to rephrase the thesis is by changing the structure.

If you began the thesis with a prepositional clause, restate it by starting with the subject.

Let’s say the original thesis started, “During the beginning of the twentieth century in Africa, colonialists…”

In the restatement, you could say, “Colonialists in Africa in the early twentieth century…”

Change the tense

The thesis statement in the introduction is probably in the future tense since you were informing the readers what they should expect.

For instance, “This paper will examine the prevalence of drug abuse among the youth…”

When rephrasing the thesis statement in the conclusion, you can use past tense since you are telling the reader what you have already discussed.

Change the wording

Identify the crucial words and phrases in the original statements and replace them with stronger synonyms.

You can use the Thesaurus function in your word processor, an online thesaurus, or the traditional hard copy dictionary to look for synonyms.

You cannot replace everything, especially prepositions, and articles.

Therefore, you should focus on changing the adjectives, adverbial phrases and nouns that add meaning to the point you are trying to put across.

Break it up

The thesis statement in your introduction is probably brief, a sentence or two.

But, in conclusion, you have the liberty to make it longer.

So, break up the points and spread them across several sentences, or even a paragraph.

Not only will the thesis statement read and sound different, but it also show how well you have proven your argument in the body of the essay.

Conclusion

Restating a thesis statement is important if you are to write a good conclusion to your essay.

The restated thesis should emphasize your stand on the topic of discussion.

Therefore, it should make it persuasive and definitive.

And, the tips shared above will help you do just that.

Use our free Rephrase Thesis Statement Generator Tool Here

 

Literature Review

How to Write Literature Reviews

How to Write a Literature Review: Step By Step Guide

A literature review provides the current and complete state of knowledge on a given topic as published in academic journals and books. Scholars usually write literature reviews on topics with limited information.

Basically, it is a summary of the references to a given topic. However, you are required to synthesize the sources you choose.

For instance, a student might be asked to provide a new interpretation of old sources or to provide an interpretation that combines old and new references.

What is the significance of a literature review?

The main purpose of a literature review is to summarize and organize the ideas from previous publications.

A literature review should be objective and should not add information that is not published.

But, it is not just supposed to summarize sources – a writer should connect the sources by looking for common ideas or trends.

A literature review provides a useful guide towards a certain topic that has limited sources.

Therefore, it comes in handy when you do not have enough time to conduct thorough research.

Things To Do Before Beginning Your Literature Review

Before beginning your literature review:

Seek clarity from the lecturer

Confirm from your lecturer:

  • The number and types of sources to include
  • If you need to evaluate the sources
  • And, if subheadings and additional information is mandatory

Revise other reviews

Look at other literature reviews in our field or course. Going through such reviews will give you a clearer idea of how to write your review. Furthermore, these previous reviews in your field will have references that will be a good place to start your research.

Narrow down the scope of your research

Some topics have many sources. And, your lecturer probably does not expect you to include all of them in your review.

Therefore, you need to narrow your topic so you can reduce the material you have to go through.

Consider the date of your sources

Let’s say you are composing a literature review about the treatment of a certain medical condition.

Medical procedures change regularly to accommodate current studies.

So, when writing a review you need updated sources as references that are even a year old could be out-of-date.

On the contrary, if you are writing a review in social sciences, the review might require you to assess how things have changed over time. In such cases, old sources should be included.

Literature Review Writing Tactics

The following are some tactics of writing a review:

Focus on an idea

A good literature review focuses on an idea. That is to say, you need to read and understand your sources, and then find a central idea that connects them.

For instance, you could focus on:

  • How well your sources present a given topic
  • A trend your sources reveal
  • Something that is missing from all your sources

Have a thesis statement

The typical literature review does not have a thesis statement.

However, it is advisable to tell the reader the idea, concept, or principle, behind the compilation of the review. In other words, try and inform a reader what they should expect.

The following are two samples of excerpts from reviews:

  1. The contemporary treatment for kidney failure is a combination of medicine and surgery.
  2. Should social media be considered in courses in the field of society and culture?

Pick an organizational format for your sources

This is a question of how you will present your review. What topics or subheadings will you include and how will you arrange them?

A literature review has three basic sections:

  • Introduction
  • Body (the section that lists and discusses different sources)
  • Recommendations or conclusion

Before writing the body of the review, you need to consider how you will organize the sources. The following are the methods you can use to organize your sources:

  1. Chronological – in a chronological organization, you arrange your sources according to their date of publication. In a literature review, you start with the earliest source and end with the latest source.
  2. Trend or theme – you can identify a trend or theme in your topic and organize your sources according to it. For instance, let’s say your review’s topic is cervical cancer treatment. You could use a thematic organization to organize your sources for types of cervical cancer. Therefore, you will have a section of sources covering squamous cell carcinomas and another on adenocarcinomas.
  3. Methodological – this approach focuses on the methods of the writers not the content of the sources. The method of the writer affects how they discuss a topic. For instance, when looking at women’s rights, you could focus on the cultural differences in the perception of women’s rights in Africa, the Middle East, Europe, and America. Writers from these different regions will discuss women’s rights differently due to cultural bias.

Once you pick an organizational structure, it will be easy to deduce the segments you need to include in the body of your literature review.

At times your study requires additional information that you cannot incorporate in the organizational approach you picked. Such segments include:

  • History: this segment explains the chronological progression of the field or the sources included in the review. It can also explain something that is necessary to understand the review. This segment is mostly included if the organizational approach is not chronological.
  • Methods or standards: include this statement t explain the criterion you used to choose sources for your review. For example, you could use this subheading to explain to your readers that your review only includes only peer-reviewed journals.
  • Questions for further research: if your review sparks questions or a need for further research, include this segment.
  • Current situation: This section includes information that a reader requires to understand the idea behind your review.

The Dos And Don’ts Of Literature Review Writing

At this point you have decided on a focus for your review, you have your sources, and you have decided on an organizational structure and the additional segments to include. The next step is to start writing your review.

When writing your review, consider the following guidelines.

The Dos of literature review writing

  1. Back up your content with evidence

Whatever you are writing in your literature review has to be legitimate. Therefore, like any other academic paper, the content of your literature review has to be backed up with evidence. That is especially true when making a point or elucidating an argument in your introduction.

2. Include only important points

From your sources, you can deduce very many points. But, you only need to include the points that are relevant to the focus of your review.

3. Summarize and synthesize your sources

Take the important points from a source and summarize them. Then, include information on how the texts change your thinking and its significance to your research. The point is to connect your sources to the focus of your review.

4. Limit the use of direct quotes

A literature review looks into several sources. Therefore, it does not accommodate the detailed discussion of quotes from a single source. So, it makes more sense to rephrase what the writer said, rather than including a direct quote.

5. Be careful when paraphrasing

Often, you will have to paraphrase. But, when rewording, your final phrase should represent the writer’s idea accurately. To have an easy time when paraphrasing, in your text, refer to the writer of the source.

6. Revise

After finishing your work, go through it. Check that:

  • You have followed all the instructions from your lecturer
  • You have used language that is easy for your readers to understand
  • There are no grammar and typing errors
  • Your sources are documented
  • There is no jargon and fluff
  • Your sentences and ideas flow smoothly

The Don’ts of literature review writing

When writing your literature review, don’t:

  • Include sources whose research are based on assumptions and disregard or contradict the findings of your review.
  • Leave out a segment explaining the search criteria used in picking your sources.
  • Write isolated research that is not based on the focus of your review

How To Format A Literature Review

How To Format A Literature Review
How To Format A Literature Review

A literature review is a type of writing that examines published literature within a given topic.

As such, a literature review will require you to read and analyze different sources.

After that, you are required to present your understanding of the literature.

In essence, you are supposed to summarize different sources and write your synthesis.

Also, you are required to present the information in a specific order, and follow a specific format when presenting the assignment.

In this article, you will find useful information on how to format a literature review.

Structure and Format A Literature Review

Like most academic papers, a literature review should have an introduction, a body, and a conclusion.

But the content of these sections is different in literature reviews.

Introduction

The introduction of a literature review should clearly indicate the main organizing principle.

The first thing you need to do is to introduce the general topic (for example, reproductive rights of women).

Then, inform the reader the main criterion used to select the sources, which in the case of the example above could be chronological history.

Finalize the introduction by linking the main organizing principle to your sources.

Body

The body of a literature review provides a summary and synthesis of each source.

But, first, you have to choose a method to organize your sources.

There are three main ways of organizing sources in a literature review:

  • Chronologically: organizing sources chronologically means maintaining the right historical timeline.

Therefore, if you choose this organizing principle, you start with the earliest source and end with the latest source.

  • Methodologically: this organizing principle focuses on the methods used by the authors to present critical concepts. For instance, one way to methodologically organize sources on women reproductive rights is to look at the ways cultural bias affects the way authors depict the exercising of women’s rights.
  • Thematically: this refers to organizing sources in terms of a theme, trend, topic, or theoretical concepts you deem necessary to understand a given topic. Let’s say you are looking at sources in the topic of cervical cancer treatments, you could thematically organize the sources according to the type of treatments they cover, i.e., radiation and non-radiation treatments.

Conclusion

The conclusion should provide a summary of your findings.

In a literature review, you should relate your findings to the real world.

In other words, try to make your reader understand why your literature review was important.

It is also advisable to leave your readers with something to think about by ending with a rhetorical question or posing questions for further research.

Format a Literature review in APA

The instructions given by the instructor will help you determine the format and outline to use.

So before you start writing seek clarity on:

  • The review format to be utilized in citations
  • The number and types of sources to include
  • The expected length
  • The headings, subheadings, and any other background information to include

In most cases, you will present your literature review in the APA format.

If that’s the case, consider the following rules:

  1. Insert a page header, and type the page number aligned right, and the literature review title in caps left-aligned.

Note that, the title of the review should be shortened to 50 characters or less (including spaces and punctuation).

Also, the header of the first page should have the phrase ‘running head’.

2. In the title page, type the title of the review, the name of the student, and institutional affiliation.

This information should be center-aligned and should appear in the middle of the page.

The review title on the title page should not exceed 12 words.

3. Type the paper in Time New Roman font, and font size 12.

The whole document should have double-spaces paragraphs.

Conclusion

The truth is that it can be quite challenging to write a literature review.

But, with proper planning, understanding the structure, and having the correct outline, you will have an easier time.

The above guide will help you write a better literature review.

You can also sharpen your review writing skills by going through other reviews; there are free samples on our website.

Reading review examples will help you to better understand what the literature of your field requires.

If you need professional help formatting your literature review contact us now.