The Principle of Utility

Jan 1, 2017 | 0 comments

Jan 1, 2017 | Miscellaneous | 0 comments

According to Alican et al (276), the principle of utility states that an action or a rule is right, will lead to goodness or happiness that is high for a big number of people. If further states that the behaviors  or actions  are always right so long as they promote pleasure and happiness, wrong as they have a tendency of producing pain or unhappiness.

Mill et al (57) observed that Mill formulated the principle by elaborating the ethical issue’s central issue as the quest of the ultimate end or the supreme good. The design of his argument shows that the maximum happiness or the general happiness s the moral food that is ultimate.

Attfield (176) pointed out the caution Mill gives his readers that anything he produces cannot be used as a proof in the popular and also ordinary meaning of the term. The reasons he gives are that ultimate end questions are not amenable to proof directly. Anything that is good and can be proved must be done by showing their goodness.

In a real life situation principle of utility gets portrayed in a free market economy case. Some people will have an argument that the free market as the best and people should be allowed pursue the goodness where they deem it fit. However, the negative side of the argument is the many disparities that exist between poverty and wealth. Despite the all the goodness the market has done, the weak continue to suffer (Alican et al, 336).

Work Cited

Alican, Necip F. Mill’s Principle of Utility: A Defense of John Stuart Mill’s Notorious Proof. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1994. Print.

Mill, John S, and Roger Crisp. Utilitarianism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998. Internet resource.

Attfield, Judy. Utility Reassessed: The Role of Ethics in the Practice of Design. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1999. Print.