Making a claim

Oct 24, 2018 | 0 comments

Oct 24, 2018 | Miscellaneous | 0 comments

Making a claim

Rushkoff appeals to his credibility when he says in paragraph six that the object of labors is to create a state of confusion and vulnerability of young shoppers in the shoe wall, and later turn the confusion state to their advantage. At the beginning of his article, Rushkoff describes a boy who stood in front of the shoe wall confused. When Rushkoff approaches the boy and asks him what was going through his mind, the boy replied he did not know which of the trainers him were. From his explanation, the boy did not know where he fell, since the shoes were arranged in various category brands. The boy was trying to figure out which category he belonged to, through elimination.

Further, Rushkoff explains that, advertising agencies trade in the psychology of children. He adds that Marketers spend large amounts of money to identify vulnerability and capitalize of these vulnerabilities. He says that most young persons are fooled, and are later expected to develop defense mechanisms. The defense mechanism involves development of savvy-attitudes or ironic dispositions. It therefore becomes a game, since marketers develop ways to tackle the defense mechanisms to their advantage. Since marketers understand too well that parents are well informed and will not invest in products that are not useful, they prey on their children to ensure that their brands stay relevant over time. Advertising agencies have since evolved unlike in the previous times where advertisers did not work on preying on their consumers but appealing to the public to buy their products. It is for this reason that Rushkoff believes that labors take advantage on the confusion experienced by young shoppers.