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Linda Nochlin: Why the Notion of the Artistic Genius is Male Dominated

Feb 24, 2023 | 0 comments

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Feb 24, 2023 | Essays | 0 comments

Introduction

Nochlin’s essay presents the question of why there have been no great women artists. She explains the obstacles that prevent women in the West from becoming successful in the field of art. She recognizes the recent expansion of feminist activity in the United States, in her essay. Her main consideration is the nature of art together with reasons why the notion of the artistic genius is male dominated. The notion of this paper is to discuss the reasons for the lack of female artists and suggested methods of inclusion of women in the existing art history.

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According to Nochlin, the reason that explains the lack of greatness for female artists is the lack of education opportunities for female artists in the field.[1] Training opportunities in the field of art were favorable to male. Most arts educational institutions were readily available to women as to men. The knowledge of arts belong to men, and women could only study art as hobbies but not career. She argues that it is not right to consider art as being different from other fields, which need proper training opportunities.[2] Moreover, the great artist is not born genius with mysterious powers that makes them great. Every artist ones went through the educational training of art. Therefore, everyone needs specific training and experience in this field.

Nochlin realized a problem of the paradigm shift with the way in which amendments of art history aimed at involving women in the canon. She levitated the question of women art to challenge all other social and institutional factors in the study of the history of art.[3] The historical process of artistic creation and the representation has no meaning if there is a lack of understanding about social meaning and symbol operations of gender. The female art historians had to confront a domain standing for art history without art women, having initiated a canon exclusively comprising of inordinate rulers.

Linda Nochlin responded to the development of introducing female artists into the canon, by posing the question for the study of the feminine in the art, the quest for women artists, and a critique of the discourse of art history.[4] The viewpoint of equality between men and women suggests that females’ art should get cultural and social acknowledgment just as males.’ The inclusion of women in the canon raised another question on how to locate art of women within and outside the canon. The propensity is to admit the work of women into standard history.

The anticipation of gender-based equality is vague without gender contextualization and the mechanisms of exclusion. To be success in any field, one requires a fight and sacrifice. The discipline of art history should include equivalence in the study and evaluation of women art as those of men.[5] Educational art institutions should provide equal scholarships similar to other fields. The art historian needs to interpret and analyze women artists, artisans, and architects using examine theories and methods.

Conclusion

Nochlin argues that significant societal barriers such as individual glorifying, elitist, romantic, and restriction on female education in art academies, prevented women from perusing art. The response to the question of why there have been no great women artists relates to the problem of institutions of art, but not to the delinquent with female artists. The reality is there is no great aristocratic artist even with training and experience, not preferably female artists. The situation calls for the need for involvement of women in art field since they can make great artists compared to male.

Bibliography

Buikema, Rosemarie, and Anneke Smelik. 2005. Women’s studies and culture: a feminist introduction. London: Zed Books.

D’Alleva, Anne. 2005. Methods and theories of art history. London: Laurence King

Nochlin, Linda, and Maura Reilly. 2015. Women artists: the Linda Nochlin reader.

Buikema, Rosemarie, and Anneke Smelik. 2005. Women’s studies and culture: a feminist introduction. London: Zed Books. ↑
D’Alleva, Anne. 2005. Methods and theories of art history. London: Laurence King. ↑
D’Alleva, Anne. 2005. Methods and theories of art history. London: Laurence King. ↑
Nochlin, Linda, and Maura Reilly. 2015. Women artists: the Linda Nochlin reader. ↑
D’Alleva, Anne. 2005. Methods and theories of art history. London: Laurence King. ↑

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