EVIL AND SYMBOLS

Jul 22, 2019 | 0 comments

Jul 22, 2019 | Miscellaneous | 0 comments

EVIL AND SYMBOLS

 

Evil can be described as immoral or that which is harmful, unpleasant characterized by suffering and disastrous. It can also be viewed as the acts and activities that people judge as ‘bad’ and can be personalized or linked to the devil. [1]Evil involves unbalanced behavior involving anger, revenge, fear, hatred, psychological trauma, selfishness, ignorance, or neglect According to Cooper evil is noted as the power of darkness and its symbolic identified by the devouring beasts such as the serpent or dragons, the one-eyed Cyclops, some horned beasts and natural phenomena such as hurricane.[2]

Cooper elaborates this definition in the context of the battle between the good and the evil which happens spiritually in man’s own nature.[3] The war happens as a consequence of anger, revenge, selfishness, and ignorance, the war happened. It took away lots of innocent lives and it causes great and irreparable harm or damage.

Death symbolizes the veil, serpent, lion, scorpion, ashes, and the drummer.[4] Evil symbolizes three figures, which are: Dragon, Scorpion, and Toad. First of all, the dragon, in the Occident, it becomes chthonic, destructive and evil.[5] Scorpion symbolizes death, destructive force, disaster, darkness, and in Christian, it means evil.[6] Lastly, Toad depicts evil, loathsomeness and deaths.[7] For some reason, Evil defines the colour black. This colour associated with mourning and death in the Christian world based on Cooper’s Encyclopedia.[8] The examples such as dragon, scorpion, toad, destructive, war, death, and black, are the symbols of the evil. The definition of Symbol is that it is the most ancient and fundamental method of expression and it has four large body of symbolism which has become traditional over the ages and which constitutes an international language transcending the normal limits of communication. It leads to the immediate and to direct apprehension.[9] Based on Cooper’s Encyclopedia, the evil means opposite of good, immorality, religious context: a supernatural force, unbalanced behaviour, symbols of evil: the serpent or dragon: beasts, Satan, the single eye of the Cyclops, Scorpion, Toad, and war.

The symbol does not necessarily reflect evil, darkness symbolizes the transition from one stage to the other as through death and initiation. Creation and germination take place in the dark and everything return to darkness in death and termination.[10] Light and Darkness are the twin aspect of the Great Mother as destroyer and creator; birth, love and life, also death and dissolution.

The symbol of the disk illustrates the rejuvenation of life; power; spirituality; flawlessness. The winged flying disk is variously proposed as the power from heaven; Amalgamation of the solar eagle, the solar disk and the wings; the motion of the heavenly domain around the pole, spirituality, transformation. The holed disk at the centre represents the circle of the universe with the centre as the void.[11]

In conclusion, Cooper viewed the balance between the good and the evil therefor what is good could be viewed as the opposite of that which is bad. In regards to the symbols, they are used to signify various things or issues. It might be an event, a religious message, a season of extraordinary phenomena, or even a superstition.

Bibliography

Boyd, J. W. (1970). Satan and Mara: A comparative study of the symbols of evil in early Greek Christian and early Indian Buddhist traditions. Place of publication not identified: publisher not identified.

Cooper, J. C. (1986). Symbolism, the universal language. San Bernardino, Calif: R. Reginald/Borgo Press

Cooper, J. C. 2018. Ia800606.Us.Archive.Org. https://ia800606.us.archive.org/4/items/B-001-014-059/B-001-014-059.pdf

Cooper, J. C. (1986). Symbolism, the universal language. San Bernardino, Calif: R. Reginald/Borgo Press.

  1. Boyd, J. W. (1970). Satan and Mara: A comparative study of the symbols of evil in early Greek Christian and early Indian Buddhist traditions. Place of publication not identified: publisher not identified.
  2. Cooper, J. C. (1986). Symbolism, the universal language. San Bernardino, Calif: R. Reginald/Borgo Press
  3. Ibid.,188
  4. Ibid.,50
  5. Ibid.,54
  6. Ibid.,145
  7. Ibid.,174
  8. Ibid.,45
  9. Cooper, J. C. (1986). Symbolism, the universal language. San Bernardino, Calif: R. Reginald/Borgo Press.
  10. Ibid.,69
  11. Cooper, J. C. 2018. Ia800606.Us.Archive.Org. https://ia800606.us.archive.org/4/items/B-001-014-059/B-001-014-059.pdf